HOME PORT MY MODELS > LOBSTER SMACK > DAY SAILER > SMUGGLER > SAILING SCOW > CRABBING SKIFF > DORA BELLA > JOLLY BOAT > BLUENOSE II > ARMED VIRGINIA SLOOP > COLONIAL FERRY 1 > COLONIAL FERRY 2

> CRAB SCRAPING BOAT

> CRAB SCRAPE PAGE 2 > CRAB SCRAPE PAGE 3 > ALMA > HANNAH KITS FOR NOVICES TOOLS TECHNIQUES MUSEUMS LINKS ABOUT ME

Finished Model
Finished Model
I built this model in December, 2006 from plans I obtained from Wye River Models. Although the plans are not the finest, they are adequate to allow a somewhat experienced modeler to build from. The plans come with instructions (a full kit is available) and the instructions are very good. Since I can mill my own lumber, I decided not to purchase the full kit.

Click on the pictures below for larger versions in a pop-up window.

June and July, 2006
Basic Frame
Basic Frame
Bottom Planking
Bottom Planking

Construction begins with creating the stem, keel, skeg, and transom. I cut all these parts out of poplar. The sides (1/16-inch thick basswood, are then cut out and attached. At that point, you can begin planking the bottom (poplar and pine - whatever was handy). Although planking looks like is should be very easy, it is more time-consuming than one would first think due to the fact that most of the planks have to twist. This means clamping them down while the glue dries and, as you approach the bow, the planks have to be soaked and twisted prior to gluing them on.

August & September, 2006
Port-side Bow Planking
Port-side Bow Planking
Planking Transition
Planking Transition

As you approach the bow, the twist of the bottom planks becomes fairly severe. In addition, you have to make a transition from the planks lying over the side planking to fitting inside of the side planking. The instructions offer no help at all in how to do this (and, in fact, don't even mention it). To solve the problem, I visited a museum in Deltaville, VA and took a photo of a real boat planked in the same manner. I applied the real technique to the model.

Starboard-side bow planking
Starboard-side Bow Planking
Shaped bow planking
Shaped Bow Planking

About 1-1/2- to 2-inches from the stem, you change to a different size planking material (thicker and narrower chunks). Once the planks are all on and the glue is dry, they can be carved and sanded to final shape. This too replicates planking practices on real boats of this type. These chunks don't have to be twisted, so they go on pretty quickly.

One thing I would do differently if I built this model again would be to carve a rabbet in the keel in the bow area where the planks sit against the side of the keel rather than on top of it. This would replicate actual practice and would, I think, make a neater job since the planks would sit down in the rabbet (which could be cut straight). It's hard to keep the keel edge of the planks perfectly straight otherwise (and as you can see in the picture above, mine aren't). The instructions don't say anything about cutting a rabbet (I assume to simplify the building process). The good news is that, once mounted on a base, this part of the model won't be very visible and the paint will hide a lot of it as well.

Go to Page 2 Go to Page 2